President comparing someone to Hitler?! Is this REALLY Presidential? It’s been said before! By a President!

presidential-speechI, as many others watched the recent presidential news conference, was somewhat surprised at some of the language that the President  used in his monologue.  I, at times, could not believe the tone and type of language that he used, but after some research looked for some Presidential language that could be better.  However, I found the following quotes from a past US President.  Can you identify who said this quote…

“He is a Hitler at heart, a demagogue in action and a traitor in fact.  In 1942 he should have been hanged for treason.  In Germany under Hitler, his deal, in Italy under the great castor oil giver, or in Russia now he would have been eliminated.”(1)

…or this one?

“The White House is open to anybody with legitimate business, but not to that son of a bitch.”(2)

Or the fact that, at one point, this US President was just $10 away from being a member of the Ku Klux Klan?!

“At one point, …he enjoyed meeting with the white-sheeted brotherhood of the local Ku Klux Klan.  Coveting its electoral support, he was ready to join it, even depositing his ten-dollar initiation fee.  They demanded, however, that he support no Catholics in patronage positions.  He drew away — and demanded his ten dollars back.” (3)

He changed his mind, letting his better inclinations overcome his political inclinations. Whew!

It is also interesting that people thought of this President as “unfit, unwise, or just plain out of his depth…”(4)

I point these very real historical events and words to reveal that there are presidents that have spoken their opinions, had brushes with the side of society that we would rather not discuss or acknowledge, and yet have been considered some of the best presidents in our country’s history.  In fact, the US President that said (and did) the above is considered by the American Political Science Association’s Presidents & Executive Politics section as being one of the top 10 US Presidents! (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2015/02/16/new-ranking-of-u-s-presidents-puts-lincoln-1-obama-18-kennedy-judged-most-over-rated/?utm_term=.acae4803997f)

The US President that did and said the above?  Harry Truman!  That’s right, the man who ordered the bombing of the Empire of Japan and ended WWII in the Pacific.  A diehard Democrat, he at one point would not ride the Dumbo Ride in Disneyland because he did not want to be seen riding an Elephant, the symbol of the Grand Old Party (GOP)!(http://disneyparks.wikia.com/wiki/Dumbo_the_Flying_Elephant_(Disneyland_Park)

What does this mean?  It means that history judges differently than the present.  The idea that a person makes statements (or actions) that are unbelievably harsh, or uncompromising, does not mean that person is a bad President, just someone who fails to consider what they said (or did) when they said (or did) it.  I am not saying the current President is right when he said the things in that news conference.  I just urge people to check history and see the  relationship to others in that same office.  It will at least put historical context to the overall discussion.

It is very difficult being in a leadership position, especially THIS leadership position.  You are in the “fishbowl” at all times with people watching your every move.  Speaking your mind is not taken the same by everyone (or anyone for that matter).  However, the data does not match great Presidents with their speaking ability.  It matches it with their actions in office.  This is going to be an interesting 4 years.  I do not envy ANYONE in that elected position.  You lose in the present, but may win in the future.

(1)Kenneth Weisbrode, The Year of Indecision, 1946, Viking Publishers, 2016, page 145 (Truman was referring to Joe L. Lewis, Union Leader).

(2)Ibid., page 146.

(3)David Pietrusza, Harry Truman’s Improbable Victory and the Year That Transformed America, Union Square Publisher, NY, 2011, page 5.

(4)Weisbrode, page 149.

Learn, Offer, Value, Educate (LOVE)

 

 

Advertisements

Lies, Danged Lies, and…Percentages?!

percentagesAs a person focused on the “truth to data” realm, I find it somewhat frustrating (sometimes amusing, but often frustrating) that there are writers that feel that throwing in a statistic (small “s”) in their articles somehow bring to bear the force of data to make their point.  Such was an article in the Baltimore Sun on 12 February 2017 that started with “An overwhelming 97 percent of scientists agree that climate change is real and that human activity is responsible” (“Fake news may be vulnerable to ‘vaccination'” by Sean Greene).  The irony is that the article was about “fake news.”  Although the writing was excellent, Mr. Greene missed the point entirely with his first sentence.  There are so many questions I have concerning where he got he 97% figure.

  1.  How many is 97%?
  2.  How many are the 3% that are remaining?
  3.  What research is associated with the 97%?  When was their most current research concerning climate change published?

These are just three of the questions that I asked myself while I tracked down the study generally mentioned by Mr. Greene in his article (he cited the study as being from the Pew Research Center report).  I found a study on the Pew Research Center website (http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/10/04/public-views-on-climate-change-and-climate-scientists/) and looked through the article, trying to find the 97% figure mentioned in the quote above anywhere in the article.  I was unsuccessful in finding this figure.  I did find a quote that said “a Pew Research Center survey of members of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) found 93% of members with a Ph.D. in Earth sciences (and 87% of all members) say the Earth is warming mostly because of human behavior.”  Again, how many is 93%?  Well I looked at the membership of the AAAS and found that they have no membership figures on their outward facing site, so I had to look at Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Association_for_the_Advancement_of_Science) and found that they have 120,000 members.  What this means is that 8400 members (7%) of the AAAS do not agree with the 111,600 members that say that warming is the result of human behavior.  This is something to consider in the long run, especially since 8400 is not a small number of scientists.  The hilarious (read frustrating) part of the entire newspaper article was that the quote at the beginning of the article was used during a survey conducted to show that people are easily manipulated through something as innocuous as  a pie chart with the above quote.  Why sure people are manipulated through pie charts!  They are also manipulated by percentages given in various articles.  (For instance, I read recently that software attacks of cell phones of a particular brand increased 163% in one month!  Would you buy that brand of cell phone?!)

I think that we ALL need to be careful of where we use data and then try to rationalize that use with a reference that can be “pre-bunked” (using a term from Mr. Greene’s article).  I actually agree with many of the suppositions that Mr. Greene wrote in his article, I just think that using data without the raw numbers is the same as saying that 100% of the writers of this blog do not agree with using percentages without backing it up with raw numbers.  Does that make you want to get more numbers to understand the percentages?  Would you like a pie chart?  I thought not.

Learn, Offer, Value, Educate (LOVE)

The Job Is not Done Until the Paperwork is Finished!

paperwork

We often look at the cost of a program and see the outward benefits, but fail to see the underlying costs that are associated with said program.  Such is the complexities involved in any new program, especially when it comes to state or federal government programs.

A great example of this is the Affordable Care Act (ACA), otherwise known as Obamacare.  According to the current data, approximately 20 million people are now on health care that did not have health care in the past (even though there are approximately 6 million that no longer have health care that had it before, giving the NET at 14 million rather than 20 million, but that is another article for another day).  The focus of this article is the associated paperwork that ACA implements as a result of this new program.

Specifically, I would like to mention the 1095-B and 1095-C, Health Care Coverage form and Employer Funded Healthy Care Coverage Form respectively.  Because of various medical coverage, I received a number of these forms and my wife also received a number of these forms.  Now, let’s extrapolate these to the population of people in the US that currently receive these forms.

If the figures are correct that 20 million people get health care coverage, this would mean that there are (at least) 20 million pieces of paper that are generated EACH YEAR to appropriately document that these people have health coverage.  That would mean that there has to be printing devices to print these, mailing costs to mail these, and of course a department to ensure they track the distribution of these forms.

Let’s assume for a moment that it costs 1 dollar to print one of these forms, 30 cents to mail them, and the department in question consists of 20 people each making 50,000 dollars per year.  That would mean that the costs are as follows (per year):

20 million dollars to print

6 million dollars to mail

1 million dollars in salary

TOTAL:  27 million dollars

And this figure does not take into consideration more than the 20 million people who get this form that are currently on health care; in other words the ones that are already on health care coverage.  The costs could be 5 to 10 times what I listed per year.  And this is just for the paperwork!

Now, this is unbelievable low considering the Congressional Budget Office original estimation of the cost of ACA, which was over 700 BILLION DOLLARS for five years between 2014 and 2019 (https://www.cbo.gov/publication/44176).  However, it is important to note the “small” costs that are a part of this that will continue long after the large costs are mitigated (or just maintained as is often the case).

In the meantime, if one takes a look at programs like Social Security, we often do not realize the cost of these types of programs, which approach 1 TRILLION DOLLARS per year in benefits!  It is those types of programs that are associated with TONS of paperwork that, even though they are more digital, does not often decrease the costs of those programs since the maintenance of the documentation for these programs can often lead to additional costs against that program.

How do we correct these paperwork nightmares?  One way might be to introduce legislation that institutes a default choice — that everyone has health care unless proven that they do not.  Of course, I am sure there are other ways to reduce or eliminate these paperwork overflows.  Until then, we will be faced with funding the paper that will be a central part of our lives.

Learn, Offer, Value, Educate (LOVE)

How much are we “into” NATO? Check the Data!

picture1There has been much discussion about whether or not we should restructure NATO, given the change in defense posture and the ever-growing “nation agnostic” threats that currently exist such as ISIS, cyberthreats, etc.  Given that we are part of NATO (since 1949) and that we conduct joint exercises in Europe, as well as contributing to the defense of Europe, we should probably know how much we have invested into the organization.

The chart below depicts the percent that our defense expenditures contribute to the NATO defense posture.  As you can see, we have NEVER contributed less than 56% of the NATO budget, although these data did have some differences based on NATO financial reports in different years (mainly because of different definitions of NATO vs NATO/Russian contribution).  However, I took this data straight from the NATO documents depicting the financial figures (http://www.nato.int/cps/en/natohq/news_127537.htm).

nato-contributions

US Defense Contributions to NATO (See citation in text)

What does it all mean?  If you take a look at the US contributions vs European contributions you see a gradual increase in most countries contributions, but most come from the US.  It might be time to reduce our overall expenditures in this arena and have the Europeans take on more of the cost.  Germany seems to be coming up to speed, but given their stature in Europe as the center of economic development, it would seem they could become the main contributor, along with France, Spain, and Italy. Fair contributions based on nation involvement seems to be the best way of equalizing the funding of this very important organization but that is said without any real background information or political/economic information on why we have contributed so much to NATO.  This data speaks only on percentage (which incidentally runs in the billions of dollars per year).

The NATO council would have to meet and discuss a plan for future joint defense planning including resources that accompany this plan.  Until then, we will continue to contribute to an organization that has been a major part of the defense of Europe and has grown since the breakup of the Warsaw Pact (NATO’s original foe).

But in the meantime, the data presented shows a distinct difference between the US and European nations in defense contributions to an organization that entails the “North Atlantic” not just the US.  Maybe it is time for NATO to reorganize and restructure to better meet the future need of European Defense.

Learn, Offer, Value, Educate (LOVE)

Numeric Hysterics – Ask The Right Questions!

crazy-numbers

 

I have seen so many numbers being thrown around the press lately with little explanation of those numbers.  The numbers are given in headlines or headers that are accompanied by a narrative that incorrectly concludes what those numbers represent or – worse – no narrative that lets the uninformed observer make their own conclusion.  A few examples are necessary in order to further illustrate this very concerning trend.

I was reading in a newspaper that Social Security was receiving a .3 percent increase.  After seeing that, I talked with a few people about the article in different venues, asking them the amount of the increase.  Their response — 3% increase.

I explained that figure was wrong, and that it was in fact POINT 3 % increase.  They looked at me and stated that it was the same.  I explained that a 3% increase meant that for every $1.00 there would be a 3¢ increase.  Again, they said that is the same as POINT 3% increase.  I further explained that a POINT 3% increase meant that for every dollar there would be a .3¢ increase!  In other words, it would take 10 TIMES that increase to make the 3% increase that people think they are getting.  Remember that 3% is the same as saying .03 and .3% increase is the same as same .003.

Well, that is one simple case of incorrect conclusions, but the other one is much more serious.  It entails that percentage of police stops of minorities vs non-minorities in Baltimore County, Maryland.  According to a televised segment, there was a horizontal bar graph that showed that 56% of stops in Baltimore County were made against minorities.  With just a slight explanation, and more editorial comment, the narrator stopped short of explaining in detail where this information originated or what it really meant.

In order to really understand the data, several questions must be asked:

  1.  Where were the stops done (area of the county)?
  2.  Why were the drivers being stopped (warrants, tail lights, speeding)?
  3. What is the percentage of minorities in the area where the officer made the stop?

I list these questions because what the horizontal bar graph presented was just one perspective of the data — the number of stops made and to whom was stopped.  There are questions as to where and why that are not answered by these data.

A more telling data set might have been if the officer gave warnings to non-minorities but not minorities, or if the officer pulled the driver over after they identified the race, but I did not see any of these questions in the bar graph on the screen.  I just saw a graph that (without further description) showed that Baltimore County Police Officers treated minority drivers worse than non-minority drivers.  Without further explanation, or some more specific data, this is not only incorrect, but potentially damaging (guilty before being proved guilty).

There are situations where statistics can help.  A study completed by three researchers partnered at three prestigious universities included jury pools from counties in two states and did a series of statistical testing on these data points.  Their study is both extremely informative and contains a number of developed hypotheses (questions) that were explored and tallied.   I will not go into the conclusion since it is not the conclusion that is important (although well worth the reading of the study), but the lengths to which the students went to study the data, not just present it in its “naked” state.  You can see the study at: http://repository.cmu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1349&context=heinzworks

So what do I wish to achieve from this article?  I want to point out two very important points:

  1. STOP presenting data without studying that data for spurious conclusions and indicators
  2. ASK the right questions concerning the data so that there is appreciation of what that data REALLY shows

In this day and age, we are prone to take extreme steps without a real representation of what a graph means and how those numbers affect not just us personally, but what they say about us as a collective.  We need to take each data set and question it to the point of getting to the truth.  Only then can we swerve away from numeric hysterics.

Learn, Offer, Value, Educate (LOVE)

“Moon Shot” For Cancer Cure? Not Possible Unless Requirements are Clear!

picture2I, along with others, listened intently to President Obama and Vice President Biden talk emotionally about a “Moon Shot” for a cure for cancer.  Congress is on board, along with just about every American.  After all, the cause is noble, the life saving potential is clear, so let’s all just move on and get it done – right?

I have been a project manager for decades, mainly in the Federal Government and I can tell you that just the pure definition of “Moon Shot” is a misnomer to this very large (and expensive) venture for which we have embarked.

First, the original moon shot had a time frame.  President Kennedy stated in his State of the Union address very specifically the time frame for landing on the moon – by years end of 1969 (“by the end of the decade”).  Okay, what is the time frame of the Cancer “Moon Shot?”   I see that there is web site that speaks to the Moon Shot 2020 initiative, which so far is split into 3 Phases, the last one implementing new immunotherapy by 2020.  In this instance, at least there is a time frame explicitly stated, so at least something is in relative stone, although the “intermediate” steps to these 3 Phases is still in “fluidity.”  This could be an issue in the future since 2020 is less than 3 years away!

However, even President Obama does not believe that a cure can be completed in that amount of time.  President Obama stated to a group of school kids that “[cancer] probably won’t be cured in my lifetime, but I think it will be cured in yours.” (http://www.politico.com/story/2016/01/joe-biden-cancer-research-moonshot-217854).  This is one of the champions of the “Moon Shot.”  That is not a real confidence builder for me if I was the project manager on this one.

Second, the physical goal of the Cancer “Moon Shot” is a moving target.  The Moon was not unpredictable.  We could calculate the orbit of the Moon and make the adjustments accordingly to plan the landing — even where to put the Lunar Excursion Module.  Cancer is a very unpredictable disease since it adapts to individuals and progresses at times silently until the body reacts.  If the goal is to get an immunotherapy by 2020, how will the disease look then?  With the genome map, will the disease adapt to new environments? Cancer is still a moving target.  The frustrations that exist in this endeavor are those that have existed since we have started this battle and will continue until we can get a step ahead of the cancer.  Maybe the REAL goal is not to provide immunotherapy, but to predict where it will strike and prevent it.  A vaccine might be something that will help, but certainly this is not small pox or polio, although at the time these diseases were as illusive and cunning as cancer is now.

Finally, what is the number one killer of people in the United States?  I keep hearing that it is cancer and that would be false!  The number one killer in the US is the same one that has existed for decades (that’s right – decades) — heart disease.  If you do not believe me, then I refer you to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) which publishes a yearly look at deaths from various causes (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr65/nvsr65_05.pdf*).  We have yet to solve the heart disease problem, although we are making progress in the treatment and prevention of the disease, but all of this comes down to making small steps.

So, let’s review.  The three areas of a project that are vital are cost, time, and quality.  The cost for this project has yet to be specified, since studies could increase in cost as well as the various costs for new research facilities, bureaucracies (like the National Institutes of Health departments that will be developed as a result of this initiative), and other as of yet unspecified costs.  The only time frame I see is for the 3 Phases and the 2020 end date.  It took 10 years (or close to it) to get two humans on the Moon.  It cost billions, and a number of lives in the process.  That was the 1960s!  And the most important thing is that there is a champion like Joe Biden who has taken on the initiative, but even scientists are concerned that his clout will wane after he leaves office (http://www.politico.com/story/2016/01/joe-biden-cancer-research-moonshot-217854).  At this point, although there is a great start to the requirements (the quality end of project management), the actual milestones are few which can lead to some problems in the future when the “lesser” more attainable requirements are avoided for the more “optical” results.

And please remember that this is all a good cause, but the numbers that die from cancer are still less than those that die from heart disease.  I did a little research on age vs disease and the results are below.  From this chart you can see that the death from cancer occurs at younger ages than heart disease.  If the Cancer 2020 effort is focusing on older study patients are they really focusing on that age group that is the proper target?  Just food for thought.

picture1

I wish the study a great deal of good fortune.  Eliminating cancer is something that will undoubtedly help us a nation to build our future with our present population.  And it is easy to cheer on this effort.  Its nobility is something that is indisputable.

Learn, Offer, Value, Educate (LOVE)

 

Political Appointee? – Don’t Be a “Bucket Leader!”

drip

In a little more than a month we will have a new President and, in preparation for his transition, there are plenty of Political Appointees that either have already been selected, or are about to get their letter of congratulations.

As a former employee of the Federal Government in several agencies over 30 years, I can tell you that the anticipation of these new political appointees is similar to waiting for a root canal.  The pain seems to get worse as the time approaches.  Although I am writing this article so that the new appointees will get a little preparation before going to their new post, I also doubt that many will read the advice since some of them already know EVERYTHING that goes on in the government, even if they have never served a day of federal government employment in their life.

So, as a stage setting measure, let me tell you something about being a Federal Government employee.

First, most employees of the Federal Government are hard-working individuals that feel their employment makes a difference and they do their job with a dedication and loyalty that would bring tears to your eyes.  There are some that are lazy and apathetic, but I would dare say that those types exist in every avenue of employment whether they are public or private industry.

Second, most employees of the Federal Government have FORGOTTEN more than you will ever KNOW about how the government process works, especially if you have never been a government employee.  They understand the regulations and the different elements of getting the job done, and have done so in spite of these regulations for decades.  They know what they are doing and sometimes just acknowledging that knowledge is enough to keep them going for another year or so.

Third, think of the Federal Government employee like a sailor on an aircraft carrier called the USS Government.  As any Navy person will tell you, it takes miles to turn an aircraft carrier, and so the analogy fits with the agency that you are about to join.  Nothing, and I mean nothing, gets done in a year.  Here’s why:

August – Contracting, HR, Budget, Accounting and the rest of the people who make the agency work are getting ready for the new fiscal year.  Everybody is trying to spend the money that they were budgeted so that they can “clear the books” for the new fiscal year.

September – Remember August?  Well, it is worse now because those departments that are behind in their spending are REALLY spending now just to catch up.  It is chaos.

October – New fiscal year and everyone is clearing the decks.  The new budget is being vetted and everyone is taking a breath

November – Veterans Day, Thanksgiving is happening this month and people are starting to get ready for the holidays, but work continues given those holidays.  It starts to slow in productivity.

December – Productivity is slow, but work still continues.  People are starting to get ready for the real big holidays coming up.  Christmas happens and people are leaving for the holiday

January – New Years, Martin Luther King Day and productivity is still lower than normal, but slowly ramping up.  Snow is lurking on the East Coast and Mid-West, and maybe one or two snow days are in the mix.

February – Presidents’ Day and at least one big snow fall, calling for as much as a week away from work.  Productivity is still level but people are cautious about coming in to work on the East Coast, where most of the HQ locations exist.

March – Work in full swing and productivity is up.  No government holidays until May.

April – Same/Same.  Easter is in there, but the month is stable and the weather is warmer.  Full productivity

May – Memorial Day starts the summer vacation season, but for the most part May is productive

June – Summer vacations now that school is out.  Projects are complete or nearing completion (from those started two years ago as a minimum).

July – Starting to think about the new fiscal year.  Budget and accounting are starting to close out invoices so that the new year can be prepared.

August – “Which brings us back to DOE” (apologies to Sound of Music)

The above example does not mean that the employees do not work for the entire 12 months, but most of them work so hard you want them to take the time to recharge or else they will burn out and, unlike private industry, will just shut down enough to get through your tenure, still remaining in your office.  You want to ensure this burn out does not happen.  So, from this little example, you can see that there is a rhythm to this whole cycle.  As I told someone once, “it is not that you want to step on any toes, you just want to ensure that everyone knows the choreography.”  You have to know the dance steps so you won’t be embarrassed.  Trust me, you may serve upwards of 8 years, but your tenure can be cut short if you do not play well with others.

I have seen it.  I have seen political appointees removed from federal buildings in handcuffs and not in handcuffs.  I have seen them packing their boxes and no one saying good-bye to them as they took the exit walk out the front door.  You do not want to be one of those – right?  Here are some somethings to do (and not to do)

Do:

  1. Get to know the people in your office prior to espousing your philosophy of how things were done in private industry.  Federal Government is not private industry (and never will be).  There is no profit made here (no matter how hard you try).  When I say get to know them, I do not mean the 5 minute “tell me about yourself” horse poop.  I am talking about 30 minutes with each one after you review their personnel file so that you can find out about their quality of life priorities.  You are in this agency for a few years, they may be here for decades.
  2. I hate to say it this way – but sit down and shut up.  That’s right, no pontificating, no grand speeches, no talk about this is how things are going to go when YOU are in charge.  Let your actions speak much louder than your words.  If you want to give an entrance speech, say that you want to “learn from your troops.”  And THEN DO JUST THAT!
  3. Get to understand the agency’s process. READ THE AGENCY STRATEGIC PLAN!  Know the main points.  Understand that every year this plan changes so also understand the frustration that is associated with a “FNG” coming in to the place with THEIR plan rather than the AGENCY plan.  Do your homework now so you won’t be in a rut when you first arrive.
  4. I realize that you had all these perks when you were in private industry, but it is different when you get to the agency.  You may not have a driver or a car and may even have to get your own coffee.  If you are already doing this – great!  If you have not done this, you may want to do this when you first arrive and it will make a great difference in how people see you.  You are the leader – lead by example.
  5. Recognize good work (not just work for you).  People that are doing more than their share need that recognition.  Freely give it to them, preferably in public.

DO NOT:

  1. Ridicule in public – ever.  If you want to isolate your loyalty, then ridicule people in public.  If someone is silent in one your meetings and you want them to say something then ask them nicely.  “Sue, I would value your opinion on this issue” is much better than “If you have nothing to say, Sue, then maybe you should not come to these meetings.”  I have actually been in meetings when the political appointee said things like this to me.  I shut up (or never went to another meeting).
  2. Espouse your philosophy on the first day.  Your vision is something that needs revising and revisiting – period.  Some of these employees have already had their guidance at the beginning of the fiscal year.  You are popping in January (already at the 25% point of the fiscal year), so do not expect that people can turn on a dime.  Save it for the Spring and spend the January/February/March time frame giving your employees some time to get used to you.
  3. Be a “bucket leader.”  My father used this term to denote someone who comes in like a person placing their hand in a bucket of water and splashing it around.  When they remove their hand, the water will go back the way it was.  Unless you set the stage for long-term change, that is exactly what will happen after you leave.

Now, I am saying all this because I am assuming you WANT to make good impression or make long-term change.  If you are coming into the agency to build your resume and do not care about the government agency, then I cannot say I am surprised, just disappointed.  You will join some others that preceded you.  But I have to tell you that I have seen some political appointees that were fantastic, left a great impression, changed the agency for the long term because instead of changing something big, they focused on small changes that helped the overall process without interrupting the routine of individuals in a big way.  It is those appointees that made a difference.

Like I said in the beginning, if you just take a few of these points and use them it will make a great difference in your time at the government agency.  If this comes off a little strong, I am sorry for being presumptuous, but just thank God that I am a retired government employee and do not have to relive those transitions, and hope that these few words can help you make a very smooth transition.  Sometimes they are just like a root canal, but other times they are like a root canal without anesthesia.

Good Luck!

Learn, Offer, Value, Educate (LOVE) http://www.grectech.com